Another delta linocut joins the family

My latest linocut commission has been safely delivered, so I can now reveal Flowing Freely — Goose River.

linocut of Canadian river delta
©Elizabeth Busey, Flowing Freely — Goose River. Reduction linocut on Rives BFK, 14 x 22in (image size) ed. of 7, $375.

Sometimes realism is what is needed

My topographical work is often a blend of locations and shapes, but occasionally I highlight actual places in a more realistic way. Flowing Freely shows a snapshot of an ever-changing river delta in the Goose River, Labrador, Canada. The soft peach and blue parts of the form are the shifting sandy soils of the delta that are sweeping from side to side. The green parts are what geologists consider the older parts of the delta, now deceased. Continue reading “Another delta linocut joins the family”

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Renaissance makes its debut

I love topography. This should be obvious to even a casual reader of this blog. So I was delighted to have the opportunity to work with a local scientist on my first commission highlighting some spectacular scenery.

A river delta in Saskatchewan creates a blue fractal in a sea of green foliage.
©Elizabeth Busey. Renaissance at Mossy River. Reduction Linocut, 14 x 22in image size, Ed of 9, $375 unframed.

Professor Doug Edmonds of the Geology Department at Indiana University had a very particular formation that he wanted to be the subject of a linocut. During a meeting at his campus office, he explained that the Mossy River Delta in Cumberland House, Saskatchewan, Canada is a very new formation, not only for geological time, but in recorded human history as well. Continue reading “Renaissance makes its debut”

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Relief Printmaking as Topography in Action

My new series, Beloved, looks at land areas at the edge — places where land and water combine in spectacular fashion. Places that will be lost with sea-level rise.

It is often hard for people to imagine how I go about creating my linocuts. You have to think backwards, I tell them, like in watercolor. I usually have a pencil outline of the most important features of the image — in this case, land and water. After these sections are marked, I use colored pencils to remind myself where I should carve. Here is a progression from one of the linocuts:

Water is drawn in blue. Places to carve away pink.

Continue reading “Relief Printmaking as Topography in Action”

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Many things on the horizon

Elizabeth Busey.  Tranquil Terraces Dawning.
Linoleum Reduction Print, 10 x 33in, 2013.

For a person who loves landscapes, I struggle with the convention of having a proper horizon. I am enchanted by the Asian art esthetic which allows us to fully experience the spiritual aspects of landscape. So when I was faced with one oddly shaped piece of linoleum (and a delay in receiving new linoleum,) I decided to create an homage to the terraced rice paddies.

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The seen and unforeseen of life

I live in a university town. I am continually aware of the predictable changes in life — graduations from high school and college, weddings and first jobs. People move in and out of our town with regularity. Other changes — a surprise award, an illness or a job loss — are not so expected. And their results not so predictable.

Elizabeth Busey. Unforeseen. Linoleum Reduction Print
25 x 17 in, 2013.

Continue reading “The seen and unforeseen of life”

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